Cherry Tree Identification


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Cherry Tree Identification   

Cherry Tree Identification

Cherry Tree Identification

To identify a cherry tree, you’ll first need to consider the climate in which you find a tree you suspect to be a cherry. Cherry trees grow in places which do not have severe winters or summers. Too much cold and too much heat is certainly not a contributing growth factor to the cherry trees. It’s not common for cherry trees to grow in California, Arizona, or Florida. They usually grow in dry soil that doesn’t house a lot of water.The second thing you should consider to properly identify the tree is its height. Most cherry trees grow up to 25 feet (including the Myrobalan cherry plum tree and the wild black cherry tree). There are, of course, exceptions to this. For example, there is the Bird cherry tree, which can grow up to 40-50 feet.

Next, carefully observe the tree’s trunk. The trunk of an ordinary cherry tree is stiff and grayish brown. A cherry’s trunk is never green or flexible, and its bark tends to be reddish brown with horizontal stripes that turn gray as the trees grow older.

Cherry leaves are oval, flat, thin and downy. They are between 1 to 3 inches in length, and have pointed ends. The leaf margin (the edges of the leaves) is toothed (except for the black cherry tree, which has smooth edges). If you want to be absolutely sure, look at the veins. They will be raised and curvy. If your tree leaves have all of these characteristics, you can confidently claim your tree to be a cherry tree.

Although these are some ways in which you can identify a cherry tree, what could be more accurate than looking at the fruits itself? Here is a great tip to help you be sure that the fruits are safe, edible cherries. Cherries are small (they are less than an inch in diameter), and they are not packed together. They grow some distance apart.